Whip Spiders (Amblypygi)

a whip spider

a whip spider

Together with other spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks, the whip spiders (Amblypygi) belong to the arachnids. At present, scientists know of around 150 different species which mainly occur in tropic areas, for example rainforests. Many whip spiders rest beneath logs, bark, or stones during the day and become active only at night. When it gets dark the animals leave their hideouts and search for prey such as insects. Although they look fearsome (with their legs being up to 30 cm long!), whip spiders are actually quite harmless for humans.

I took their photographs during a night walk through the Adolfo Ducke Forest Reserve near Manaus, Brazil, in September 2010. Although the area is inhabited by many large animal species, such as jaguars and tapirs, it is the arthropod world which a visitor will see: abundant bugs, butterflies, ants, scorpions, and spiders crawling through the undergrowth – eat or get eaten! A true green hell!

whip spider

whip spider

crawling through the night

crawling through the night

on a tree trunk

on a tree trunk

a large whip spider

a large whip spider

15 responses to “Whip Spiders (Amblypygi)

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