Eurasian Coot (Fulica atra)

Eurasian Coot with fledglings

Eurasian Coot with fledglings

Despite its name, the Eurasian Coot (Fulica atra) does not only occur through much of Europe and Asia, but also in Australia, New Zealand, and even parts of northern and western Africa. The birds are characteristically found on lakes and ponds, but also coastal brackish waters. Compared to the Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) and other close relatives, the Eurasian Coot is much less secretive and can be seen quite commonly in open areas throughout the day. The species also inhabits parks within city limits and can be closely approached here as it is often used to and does not feel threatened by humans. The Eurasian Coot is a very common bird in Germany and can be seen almost daily hunting for small snails, eggs, insects, and worms, but also feeding on algae, plants, and seeds. I have photographed a family with young fledglings last weekend (July 2014) in Kiel, northern Germany, while the last photograph of this post was already taken in February 2014 at the coast of the Baltic Sea.

Eurasian Coot with fledgling

Eurasian Coot with fledgling

fledgling

fledgling

Eurasian Coot with fledgling

Eurasian Coot with fledgling

Eurasian Coot with fledgling

Eurasian Coot with fledgling

Eurasian Coot with fledglings

Eurasian Coot with fledglings

Eurasian Coot with fledgling

Eurasian Coot with fledgling

Eurasian Coot

Eurasian Coot

8 responses to “Eurasian Coot (Fulica atra)

    • thanks for your comment!! Wikipedia says that the juveniles changed into the adult coat with 3-4 months, but the white shield is only fully developed after 1 year!

  1. Stunning shots.
    We’ve been observing hundreds of them until 3 weeks ago. Now completely disappeared from this part of the Ria Formosa, we assume north.

    • thank you!! 🙂 they live here quite abundantly throughout the year – I only feel pity for them in the winter months seeing them swim in the ice-cold water…

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