Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus)

Warthogs in Pendjari National Park, Benin

Warthogs in Pendjari National Park, Benin

Warthogs in Pendjari National Park, Benin

Warthogs in Pendjari National Park, Benin

Warthog in Pendjari National Park, Benin

Warthog in Pendjari National Park, Benin

The Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) is a pig species occurring in the savannahs and grasslands of sub-Saharan Africa. In contrast to other feral pigs, warthogs are active during the day and only rest in the shade during midday heat. Generally, the animals live in groups of up to 15 individuals, but adult males prefer to spend most of their time in solitude. Although being omnivores, warthogs feed mainly on plants, such as grass, roots, fruits, and bark. The animals are known for their fierce character and are able to fend of leopards and other much stronger predators. Although being hunted for their tasty meat, warthogs are not yet threatened by extinction. I have photographed these agile little pigs on journeys through Namibia (February 2007) and Benin (February 2012).

warthogs in Etosha National Park, Namibia

warthogs in Etosha National Park, Namibia

little warthogs

little warthogs

a warthog family

a warthog family

close-up

close-up

young warthog in Etosha National Park, Namibia

young warthog in Etosha National Park, Namibia

young warthog in Etosha National Park, Namibia

young warthog in Etosha National Park, Namibia

warthogs on the Waterberg, Namibia

warthogs on the Waterberg, Namibia

warthog on the Waterberg, Namibia

warthog on the Waterberg, Namibia

11 responses to “Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus)

  1. Pingback: West Africa 2012 (part I) | wild life·

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