Bearded Reedling (Panurus biarmicus)

male Bearded Reedling

male Bearded Reedling

The Bearded Reedling (Panurus biarmicus) is a small, long-tailed bird occurring in temperate Europe and Asia. The species inhabits wetland, more specifically extensive reed zones. Most of the time, the birds jump around in-between canes looking for seeds in winter and insects as well as spiders in summer months. Both sexes can be easily differentiated by their plumage: while the males sport fancy black moustaches at each side of the orange bill, the females are much duller (see photographs below). Pairs form already as juveniles and become inseparable for life – how romantic!! I knew the species only through my guide book, but last weekend (May 2015) I happened to spot a flock of these extremely pretty birds at the coast of the Baltic Sea in northern Germany. I felt very lucky, because the individuals were not easy to see among the reeds! Nevertheless, the Bearded Reedling might not be as rare as I imagined and actually occurs in Germany with a few thousand pairs in suitable habitats. However, the species experiences drastic fluctuations in numbers with stark decreases during harsh winters. Fortunately, winter is NOT coming right now! 😉

male Bearded Reedling

male Bearded Reedling

male Bearded Reedling

male Bearded Reedling

a beautiful rear can also endear

a beautiful rear can also endear

on the run...

on the run…

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

male Bearded Reedling

male Bearded Reedling

catching flies

catching flies

catching more flies

catching more flies

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

female Bearded Reedling

among the reeds

among the reeds

 

21 responses to “Bearded Reedling (Panurus biarmicus)

  1. How exciting! It’s such a pretty little bird. I have felt the rush and thrill I think you felt when you saw and were making images of it when I first was able to capture our Marsh Wren. It too is very flitty and lives in the reeds.

    The images are wonderful. I hope you’re going to print at least one!

    • thank you very much!! Photographing birds in reeds is really not so easy – I feel these species are always flitting around and at the same time the canes get into the way!! I also enjoy your wildlife photography a lot!! have a great day!

  2. How very fortunate that you came across them and were even able to capture photos. This is a handsome bird, and one I had never heard of — thanks Mattias. 🙂

    • oh – I have to thank you!! 🙂
      you have to come to Europe to see them… though I believe that even here, only birders will know about the species as it is not that frequently seen!

  3. Pingback: Draw a bird day – third bird – Myr's Bytes·

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